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Stephanie Jane Hahn, Attorney At Law
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Workplace Discrimination Archives

DOJ claims law doesn't protect LBGT workers

According to the Department of Justice, civil rights legislation does not protect workers in Indiana or anywhere in America on the basis of their sexual orientation. This is counter to a position that the EEOC has held since 2012. The EEOC believes that it is impossible to distinguish between discrimination based on sex and discrimination based on sexual orientation.

Women not alone in facing wage discrimination

Indiana employees may want to take heed of research published by the Center for American Progress. The common perception that wage discrimination is mostly an issue dealt with by women is undercut by the review of data from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The numbers show a variety of filing categories beyond gender. Even when limited to gender, men are represented in significant numbers among the filers.

Avoiding subtle age discrimination

Older adults in Indiana who are job hunting may encounter subtle age discrimination. While the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act prohibits employers with 20 or more workers from discriminating against workers at or over the age of 40, companies may prefer to hire younger workers for a number of reasons including lower salary requirements. According to the AARP Public Policy Institute, more than 60 percent of workers 50 and older have experienced age discrimination on the job.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act 50 years later

As the Age Discrimination in Employment Act reaches its 50th anniversary, employment-related age discrimination claims in Indiana and around the country show no sign of abating. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, claims regarding age discrimination peaked in 2008 at over 24,000. In the past decade, at least 20,000 have been filed annually, and in 2016, there were 20,857 filings.

Appeals court protects LGBT workers from discrimination

In a major step forward for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) employees, an appeals court ruled recently that the protections of the Civil Rights Act do in fact apply to discrimination based on sexual orientation. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals handed down a decision that offers precise direction to many employers about whether or not they can treat LGBT employees differently — an issue that has come back into the spotlight lately.

Civil Rights Act may not offer equal protection in all cases

Workplace discrimination can take many shapes and sizes, but one would hope that discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity would be a thing of the past by now. Unfortunately for workers' rights advocates, a three-judge panel ruled recently on a case before the 11th Circuit appeals court, stating that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and its protections do not extend to discrimination against employees due to sexual orientation.

Bill seeks to make lawsuits against companies more difficult

The new year and new administration has brought with it a host of changes in the legal landscape of doing business and operating as a consumer. Among the new bills being debated in the current legislative season is a bill recently approved by the U.S. House that seeks to restrict the freedoms of individuals or groups to sue a company. Unfortunately, this may be a significant setback for those with legitimate workplace discrimination claims.

Uber's culture encourages toxic work environment

The New York Times conducted interviews with other 30 current and former Uber employees after a tell-all blog by a former Uber engineer ignited the Internet. The Times investigation uncovered a pervasive environment that encourages workers to harass and backstab one another. Managers routinely harassed their employees and discriminated against them based on orientation, sex, and more.

How Can I Benefit From Eradication Of Workplace Discrimination?

So you have just been hired at a prominent firm of your dreams. In your mind, such an appointment not only highlights your competency but also gives you a rare opportunity to meet influential individuals with a knack for success. Within the first few weeks, it is common to exude a zealous attitude in an attempt to impress your bosses and act as a role model to your fellow employees.

Responding to Workplace Discrimination

You can't control where and when you face discrimination, but you can control how you respond to it. If you encounter unlawful discrimination at the workplace, there are certain steps you should take towards resolving the problem without jeopardizing your job. If you are being discriminated against by one of your co-workers, bring the matter to the attention of your employer. Staying silent and hoping the discrimination stops will only embolden your harasser. It is the employer's job to make sure unlawful discrimination is not allowed at the workplace, but that is only possible if you make your problem known. Tell your employer that the discrimination is taking a serious toll on your mind. If necessary, prepare a written report of the incident to submit to the company department that deals with such matters.

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Stephanie Jane Hahn

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